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Title          
Conversations with History: Amartya Sen 
   
 
Abstract
Amartya Kumar Sen, CH (Bengali: অমর্ত্য কুমার সেন, Ômorto Kumar Shen; born 3 November 1933) is an eminent Indian economist and philosopher. He is currently the Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is also a senior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, where he previously served as Master from the years 1998 to 2004.[1][2] He is the first Asian and the first Indian academic to head an Oxbridge college. He has been called "the Conscience and the Mother Teresa of Economics"[3] for his work on famine, human development theory, welfare economics, the underlying mechanisms of poverty, gender inequality, and political liberalism. However, he refutes the comparison to Mother Teresa by saying that he has never tried to follow a lifestyle of dedicated self-sacrifice[4]. In 1998, Sen won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to work on welfare economics. Amartya Sen's books have been translated into more than thirty languages. He is a trustee of Economists for Peace and Security. In the year 2006, Time m...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Interviews
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Investment Banking Beginners Guide - Part 1 
   
 
Abstract
Investment banks help companies and governments (or their agencies) raise money by issuing and selling securities in the capital markets (both equity and debt).

Almost all investment banks also offer strategic advisory services for mergers, acquisitions, divestiture or other financial services for clients, such as the trading of derivatives, fixed income, foreign exchange, commodity, and equity securities.

Trading securities for cash or securities (i.e., facilitating transactions, market-making), or the promotion of securities (i.e., underwriting, research, etc.) is referred to as the "sell side".

The "buy side" constitutes the pension funds, mutual funds, hedge funds, and the investing public who consume the products and services of the sell-side in order to maximize their return on investment. Many firms have both buy and sell side components.
 
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Added By - Ipshita Chakraborty
Subject - Economics
Document Type - White Board
Video Duration - 00:09:25
 
 
 

 

Title          
Rational Behaviour 
   
 
Abstract
Rational Behaviour
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Tutorials
Video Duration - 00:12:35
 
 
 

 

Title          
Applications of Supply and Demand 
   
 
Abstract
The phrase "supply and demand" was first used by James Denham-Steuart in his Inquiry into the Principles of Political Economy, published in 1767. Adam Smith used the phrase in his 1776 book The Wealth of Nations, and David Ricardo titled one chapter of his 1817 work Principles of Political Economy and Taxation "On the Influence of Demand and Supply on Price".[10]

In The Wealth of Nations, Smith generally assumed that the supply price was fixed but that its "merit" (value) would decrease as its "scarcity" increased, in effect what was later called the law of demand. Ricardo, in Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, more rigorously laid down the idea of the assumptions that were used to build his ideas of supply and demand. Antoine Augustin Cournot first developed a mathematical model of supply and demand in his 1838 Researches on the Mathematical Principles of the Theory of Wealth.

During the late 19th century the marginalist school of thought emerged. This field mainly was started by Stanley Jevons, Carl Menger, and Léon Walras. The key idea was that the price was set by the most expensive price, that is, the price at the margin. This was a substantial change from Adam Smith's thoughts on dete...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - White Board
Video Duration - 00:14:04
 
 
 

 

Title          
Changes in Supply and Demand 
   
 
Abstract

Practical uses of supply and demand analysis often center on the different variables that change equilibrium price and quantity, represented as shifts in the respective curves. Comparative statics of such a shift traces the effects from the initial eqilibrium to the new equilibrium.

People increasing the quantity demanded at a given price are referred to as an increase in demand. Increased demand can be represented on the graph as the curve being shifted outward. At each price point, a greater quantity is demanded, as from the initial curve D1 to the new curve D2. More people wanting coffee is an example. In the diagram, this raises the equilibrium price from P1 to the higher P2. This raises the equilibrium quantity from Q1 to the higher Q2. A movement along a given demand curve can be described as a "change in the quantity demanded" to distinguish it from a "change in demand," that is, a shift of the curve. In the example above, there has been an increase in demand which has caused an in increase in (equilibrium) quantity. The increase in demand could also come from changing tastes, incomes, product information, fashions, and so forth.

When the suppliers' costs change f...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Discussion
Video Duration - 00:13:56
 
 
 

 

Title          
Twisting Salary 
   
 
Abstract

A salary is a form of periodic payment from an employer to an employee, which may be specified in an employment contract. It is contrasted with piece wages, where each job, hour or other unit is paid separately, rather than on a periodic basis. From the point of a view of running a business, salary can also be viewed as the cost of acquiring human resources for running operations, and is then termed personnel expense or salary expense. In accounting, salaries are recorded in payroll accounts. Similarly, the Roman word salarium linked employment, salt and soldiers, but the exact link is unclear. The...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Discussion
Video Duration - 00:08:45
 
 
 

 

Title          
Supply 
   
 
Abstract
In economics, supply and demand describe market relations between prospective sellers and buyers of a good. The supply and demand model determines price and quantity sold in the market. The model is fundamental in microeconomic analysis of buyers and sellers and of their interactions in a market. It is also used as a point of departure for other economic models and theories. The model predicts that in a competitive market, price will function to equalize the quantity demanded by consumers and the quantity supplied by producers, resulting in an economic equilibrium of price and quantity. The model incorporates other factors changing such equilibrium as reflected in a shift of demand or supply.

Strictly, very strictly considered, the model applies to a type of market called perfect competition in which no single buyer or seller has much effect on prices and prices are known. The quantity of a product supplied by the producer and the quantity demanded by the consumer are dependent on the market price of the product. The law of supply states that quantity supplied is related to price. It is often depicted as directly proportional to price: the higher the price of the product, the more the producer will supply, ceteris parib...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Discussion
Video Duration - 00:07:54
 
 
 

 

Title          
Monitoring Workers  
   
 
Abstract
Monitoring workers is a tough job. Supervisors have a tough job because removing people will be the hardest decission. Anyone who enjoys doing it should not be on the payroll. Anyone who can should not be on the payroll also.
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - 00:06:37
 
 
 

 

Title          
Demand 
   
 
Abstract
The laws of supply and demand state that the equilibrium market price and quantity of a commodity is at the intersection of consumer demand and producer supply. Here, quantity supplied equals quantity demanded (as in the enlargeable Figure), that is, equilibrium. Equilibrium implies that price and quantity will remain there if it begins there. If the price for a good is below equilibrium, consumers demand more of the good than producers are prepared to supply. This defines a shortage of the good. A shortage results in the price being bid up. Producers will increase the price until it reaches equilibrium. If the price for a good is above equilibrium, there is a surplus of the good. Producers are motivated to eliminate the surplus by lowering the price. The price falls until it reaches equilibrium. The demand schedule, depicted graphically as the demand curve, represents the amount of goods that buyers are willing and able to purchase at various prices, assuming all other non-price factors remain the same. The demand curve is almost always represented as downwards-sloping, meaning that as price decreases, consumers will buy more of the good.[1] Just as the supply curves reflect marginal cost curves, demand curves can be descri...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Course Lectures
Video Duration - 00:11:34
 
 
 

 

Title          
Comparative Advantage 
   
 
Abstract
In economics, David Ricardo is credited for the principle of comparative advantage to explain how it can be beneficial for two parties (countries, regions, individuals and so on) to trade if one has a lower relative cost of producing some good. What matters is not the absolute cost of production but the opportunity cost, which measures how much production of one good is reduced to produce one more unit of the other good. Comparative advantage is a key economic concept in the study of free trade. Under the principle of absolute advantage, developed by Adam Smith, one country can produce more output per unit of productive input than another. With comparative advantage, even if one country has an absolute advantage in every type of output, the disadvantaged country can benefit from specializing in and exporting the product(s) with the largest opportunity cost for the other country. Comparative advantage was first described by Robert Torrens in 1815 in an essay on the Corn Laws. He concluded it was England's advantage to trade with Poland in return for grain, even though it might be possible to produce that grain more cheaply in England than Poland. However it is usually attributed to David Ricardo who explained it clearly in...
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Economics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - 00:08:17
 
 
 

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