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Title          
Jumping droplets help heat transfer 
   
 
Abstract
Excerpt from MIT's Research Update - Many industrial plants depend on water vapor condensing on metal plates: In power plants, the resulting water is then returned to a boiler to be vaporized again; in desalination plants, it yields a supply of clean water. The efficiency of such plants depends crucially on how easily droplets of water can form on these metal plates, or condensers, and how easily they fall away, leaving room for more droplets to form. The key to improving the efficiency of such plants is to increase the condensers’ heat-transfer coefficient — a measure of how readily heat can be transferred away from those surfaces, explains Nenad Miljkovic, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering at MIT. As part of his thesis research, he and colleagues have done just that: designing, making and testing a coated surface with nanostructured patterns that greatly increase the heat-transfer coefficient.

The results of that work have been published in the journal Nano Letters, in a paper co-authored by Mil...

 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Patents and Inventions
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
3D Printing from MIT 
   
 
Abstract
In this video, we show how MIT research continues to push the boundaries of the burgeoning technology of 3-D printing. The following excerpt is from the MIT news office webpage at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/3d-printing-0914.html "The initial motivation was to produce models for visualization — for architects and others — and help streamline the development of new products, such as medical devices. Cima explains, “The slow step in product development was prototyping. We wanted to be able to rapidly prototype surgical tools, and get them into surgeons’ hands to get feedback.” 3DP technology involves building up a shape gradually, one thin layer at a time. The device uses a “stage” — a metal platform mounted on a piston — that’s raised or lowered by a tiny increment at a time. A layer of powder is spread across this platform, and then a print head similar to those used in inkjet printers deposits a binder liquid onto the powder, binding it together. Then, the platform is lowered infinitesimally, another thin layer of powder is applied on top of the last, and the next layer of binder is deposited."
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Flash Point, Flame Point and Auto Ignition 
   
 
Abstract
The flash point of a volatile material is the lowest temperature at which it can vaporize to form an ignitable mixture in air. Measuring a flash point requires an ignition source. At the flash point, the vapor may cease to burn when the source of ignition is removed. The fire point of a fuel is the temperature at which it will continue to burn for at least 5 seconds after ignition by an open flame. At the flash point, a lower temperature, a substance will ignite briefly, but vapor might not be produced at a rate to sustain the fire. Most tables of material properties will only list material flash points, but in general the fire points can be assumed to be about 10 °C higher than the flash points. However, this is no substitute for testing if the fire point is safety critical.This is a point on which oxidation of a lubricating oil starts The flash point is not to be confused with the autoignition temperature, which does not require an ignition source, or the fire point, the temperature at which the vapor continues to burn after being ignited. Neither the flash point nor the fire point is dependent on the temperature of the ignition source, which is much higher.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Video Dictionary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Hotwire Anemometry 
   
 
Abstract
Hotwire Anemometry
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Video Dictionary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Leaping shampoo and the stable Kaye effect  
   
 
Abstract
DOI - 10.1088/1742-5468/2006/07/P07007 Shear-thinning fluids exhibit surprisingly rich behavior. One example is the Kaye effect which occurs when a thin stream of a solution of polyisobutylene in decalin is poured into a dish of the fluid. As pouring proceeds, a small stream of liquid occasionally leaps upward from the heap. This surprising effect, which lasts only a second or so, is named after its first observer, Kaye, who could offer no explanation for this behaviour. Later, Collyer and Fischer suggested from 250 frames s−1 cine recordings that the fluid must be highly shear thinning as well as elastic and 'pituitous' (slimy or sticky). In addition, their results suggested that a rigid surface is required to back the reflected liquid stream. While the words bouncing and reflection are associated with elastic effects, we will show here that the Kaye effect is in fact a continuous flow phenomenon. We show that the Kaye effect works for many common fluids, including shampoos and liquid soaps. We reveal its physical mechanism (formation, stability and disruption) through high-speed imaging. The measurements are interpreted with a simple theoretical model including only the shear thinning behaviour of the liquid; elastic p...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
DAC Lab - Data Acquisition  
   
 
Abstract

DAC Lab. This video shows the effect of sampling frequency on data acquisition. It uses signal from a function generator and uses a LabView based instrumentation. A good hands on starter on how to create a LabView VI is also presented.

Data acquisition is the sampling of the real world to generate data that can be manipulated by a computer. Sometimes abbreviated DAQ or DAS, data acquisition typically involves acquisition of signals and waveforms and processing the signals to obtain desired information. The components of data acquisition systems include appropriate sensors that convert any measurement parameter to an electrical signal, which is acquired by data acquisition hardware.

Acquired data are displayed, analyzed, and stored on a computer, either using vendor supplied software, or custom displays and control can be developed using various general purpose programming languages such as BASIC, C, Fortran, Java, Lisp, Pascal. Specialised programming languages used for data acquisition include, EPICS used to build large scale data acquisition systems, LabVIEW, which offers a graphical programming environment optimized for data acquisition and MATLAB provides a program...

 
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Added By - justin
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:09:07
 
 
 

 

Title          
Vibration Isolation Platform 
   
 
Abstract

Vibration Isolation Platform. Vibration isolation is the process of isolating an object, such as a piece of equipment, from the source of vibrations.Active vibration isolation systems contain, along with the spring, a feedback circuit which consists of a piezoelectric accelerometer, a controller, and an electromagnetic transducer. The acceleration (vibration) signal is processed by a control circuit and amplifier. Then it feeds the electromagnetic actuator, which amplifies the signal. As a result of such a feedback system, a considerably stronger suppression of vibrations is achieved compared to ordinary damping. Another technique used to increase isolation is to use an isolated subframe. This splits the system with an additional mass/spring/damper system. This doubles the high frequency attenuation rolloff, at the cost of introducing additional low frequency modes which may cause the low frequency behaviour to deteriorate. This is commonly used in the rear suspensions of cars with Independent Rear Suspension (IRS), and in the front subframes of some cars. The graph (see illustration) shows the force into the body for a subframe that is rigidly bolted to the body compared with the red curve that shows a complian...

 
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Added By - justin
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:01:56
 
 
 

 

Title          
Cardio-Vasular Tissue Biomechanics 
   
 
Abstract
Danial Shahmirzadi from the University of Maryland, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering explains the experimentation and modeling involved in cardio-vascular tissue biomechanics.
 
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Added By - sidpatel
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Seminars and Presentations
Video Duration - 00:46:37
 
 
 

 

Title          
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backs... 
   
 
Abstract
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backside Liquid Cooling of SiC Power Devices, presented by Lauren Everhart at the Mechanical Engineering Summer Lecture series at the University of Maryland (July 2008). Power semiconductor devices are semiconductor devices used as switches or rectifiers in power electronic circuits (switch mode power supplies for example). They are also called power devices or when used in integrated circuits, called power ICs. Some common power devices are the power diode, thyristor, power MOSFET and IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor). A power diode or MOSFET, for example, operates on similar principles as its low-power counterpart, but is able to carry a larger amount of current and typically is able to support a larger reverse-bias voltage in the off-state. Structural changes are often made in power devices to accommodate the higher current density, higher power dissipation and/or higher reverse breakdown voltage. The vast majority of the discrete (i.e non integrated) power devices are built using a vertical structure, whereas small-signal devices employ a lateral structure. With the vertical structure, the current rating of the device is proportional to its area, and the volta...
 
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Added By - researchusa
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Seminars and Presentations
Video Duration - 00:31:19
 
 
 

 

Title          
Leonardo Da Vinci Automovile (1495) 
   
 
Abstract
Fantastic virtual and material reconstruction of the first thing can be called car or looks like a car and works the same. The automobile that Leonardo attempted to power with a modified clockwork mechanism is one of his best-known inventions. It was not, however, an invention in the strict sense of the word, for other engineers before him had also made attempts to produce a self-powered vehicle. It is probable that Leonardo was familiar with these studies, though it is remarkable how intense Leonardo's research of this technical phenomenon was.
 
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Added By - pierce
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:01:26
 
 
 

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