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  Department of Physics
USA

 

   
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    Any speed over the speed of sound (Mach 1), which is approximately 340 m/s, 1,087 ft/s, 761 mph or 1,225 km/h in air at sea level, is said to be supersonic. Speeds greater than 5 times the speed of sound are sometimes referred to as hypersonic. Speeds where only some parts of the air around an object (such as the ends of rotor blades) reach supersonic speeds are labelled transonic (typically somewhere between Mach 0.8 and Mach 1.2).

Sounds are travelling vibrations (pressure waves) in an elastic medium. In gases sound travels longitudinally at different speeds, mostly depending on the molecular mass and temperature of the gas; (pressure has a little effect). Since air temperature and composition varies significantly with altitude, Mach numbers for aircraft can change without airspeed varying. In water at room temperature supersonic can be considered as any speed greater than 1,440 m/s or 4,724 ft/s. In solids, sound waves can be longitudinal or transverse and have even higher velocities.


     
    Education   
    B.S., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
M.S., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
     
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    B.S., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
M.S., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles(Mechanical Engineering)
     
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    Member Videos
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