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Title          
Audible Frequency Range 
   
 
Abstract    
An audio frequency (abbreviation: AF) or audible frequency is characterized as a periodic vibration whose frequency is audible to the average human. It is the property of sound that most determines pitch and is measured in hertz (Hz). The generally accepted standard range of audible frequencies is 20 to 20,000 Hz, although the range of frequencies individuals hear is greatly influenced by environmental factors. Frequencies below 20 Hz are generally felt rather than heard, assuming the amplitude of the vibration is great enough. Frequencies above 20,000 Hz can sometimes be sensed by young people. High frequencies are the first to be affected by hearing loss due to age and/or prolonged exposure to very loud noises.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Sound Reflection from Concave Surfaces 
   
 
Abstract    

Reflection is the change in direction of a wavefront at an interface between two different media so that the wavefront returns into the medium from which it originated. Common examples include the reflection of light, sound and water waves. The law of reflection says that for specular reflection the angle at which the wave is incident on the surface equals the angle at which it is reflected. Mirrors exhibit specular reflection. In acoustics, reflection causes echoes and is...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:04:44
 
 
 

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