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Title          
Physics of Fluids - Waves in a large free sph... 
   
 
Abstract    
In physics a free surface is the surface of a body that is subject to neither perpendicular normal stress nor parallel shear stress, such as the boundary between two homogenous fluids, for example liquid water and the air in the Earth's atmosphere. Unlike liquids, gases cannot form a free surface on their own. A liquid in a gravitational field will form a free surface if unconfined from above. Under mechanical equilibrium this free surface must be perpendicular to the forces acting on the liquid; if not there would be a force along the surface, and the liquid would flow in that direction. Thus, on the surface of the Earth, all free surfaces of liquids are horizontal unless disturbed (except near solids dipping into them, where surface tension distorts the surface locally). If the free surface of a liquid is disturbed, waves are produced on the surface. These waves are not elastic waves due to any elastic force; they are gravity waves caused by the force of gravity tending to bring the surface of the disturbed liquid back to its horizontal level, but due to momentum, it overshoots. Thus it oscillates and spreads the disturbance to the neighboring portions of the surface. The velocity of the surface waves varies as the square ...
 
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Added By - sidpatel
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:02:52
 
 
 

 

Title          
Leaping shampoo and the stable Kaye effect  
   
 
Abstract    
DOI - 10.1088/1742-5468/2006/07/P07007 Shear-thinning fluids exhibit surprisingly rich behavior. One example is the Kaye effect which occurs when a thin stream of a solution of polyisobutylene in decalin is poured into a dish of the fluid. As pouring proceeds, a small stream of liquid occasionally leaps upward from the heap. This surprising effect, which lasts only a second or so, is named after its first observer, Kaye, who could offer no explanation for this behaviour. Later, Collyer and Fischer suggested from 250 frames s−1 cine recordings that the fluid must be highly shear thinning as well as elastic and 'pituitous' (slimy or sticky). In addition, their results suggested that a rigid surface is required to back the reflected liquid stream. While the words bouncing and reflection are associated with elastic effects, we will show here that the Kaye effect is in fact a continuous flow phenomenon. We show that the Kaye effect works for many common fluids, including shampoos and liquid soaps. We reveal its physical mechanism (formation, stability and disruption) through high-speed imaging. The measurements are interpreted with a simple theoretical model including only the shear thinning behaviour of the liquid; elastic p...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Amazing Liquid 
   
 
Abstract    
A non-Newtonian fluid is a fluid in which the viscosity changes with the applied strain rate. As a result, non-Newtonian fluids may not have a well-defined viscosity.

Although the concept of viscosity is commonly used to characterize a material, it can be inadequate to describe the mechanical behavior of a substance, particularly non-Newtonian fluids. They are best studied through several other rheological properties which relate the relations between the stress and strain tensors under many different flow conditions, such as oscillatory shear, or extensional flow which are measured using different devices or rheometers. The rheological properties are better studied using tensor-valued constitutive equations, which are common in the field of continuum mechanics.

An inexpensive, non-toxic sample of a non-Newtonian fluid sometimes known as oobleck can be made very easily by adding corn starch (cornflour) to a cup of water. Add the starch in small portions and stir it in slowly. When the suspension nears the critical concentration - becoming like single cream (light cream) in consistency - the so called "shear thickening" property of this non-Newtonian fluid becomes apparent. The application of force - f...
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Material Science and Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Cavitation in zero-g (Shockwave-Nuclei) 
   
 
Abstract    

Hydrodynamic cavitation inside a freefloating water drop produced in microgravity. (Credits: ESA, Danail Obreschkow, Philippe Kobel, Nicolas Dorsaz, Aurèle de Bosset, Mohamed Farhat).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavitation

Cavitation is a general term used to describe the behavior of voids or bubbles in a liquid. Cavitation is usually divided into two classes of behavior: inertial (or transient) cavitation and non-inertial cavitation. Inertial cavitation is the process where a void or bubble in a liquid rapidly collapses, producing a shock wave. Such cavitation often occurs in pumps, propellers, impellers, and in the vascular tissues of plants. Non-inertial cavitation is the process where a bubble in a fluid is forced to oscillate in size or shape due to some form of energy input, such as an acoustic field. Such cavitation is often employed in ultrasonic cleaning baths and can also be observed in pumps...

 
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Added By - matlabuser
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:00:38
 
 
 

 

Title          
Sound Propagation in Vacuum 
   
 
Abstract    

Sound is a travelling wave which is an oscillation of pressure transmitted through a solid, liquid, or gas, composed of frequencies within the range of hearing and of a level sufficiently strong to be heard, or the sensation stimulated in organs of hearing by such vibrations. The mechanical vibrations that can be interpreted as sound are able to travel through all forms of matter: gases, liquids, solids, and  

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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:03:31
 
 
 

 

Title          
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backs... 
   
 
Abstract    
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backside Liquid Cooling of SiC Power Devices, presented by Lauren Everhart at the Mechanical Engineering Summer Lecture series at the University of Maryland (July 2008). Power semiconductor devices are semiconductor devices used as switches or rectifiers in power electronic circuits (switch mode power supplies for example). They are also called power devices or when used in integrated circuits, called power ICs. Some common power devices are the power diode, thyristor, power MOSFET and IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor). A power diode or MOSFET, for example, operates on similar principles as its low-power counterpart, but is able to carry a larger amount of current and typically is able to support a larger reverse-bias voltage in the off-state. Structural changes are often made in power devices to accommodate the higher current density, higher power dissipation and/or higher reverse breakdown voltage. The vast majority of the discrete (i.e non integrated) power devices are built using a vertical structure, whereas small-signal devices employ a lateral structure. With the vertical structure, the current rating of the device is proportional to its area, and the volta...
 
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Added By - researchusa
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Seminars and Presentations
Video Duration - 00:31:19
 
 
 

 

Title          
GPU fluid simulation - blood 
   
 
Abstract    
I found this video on the web and it does not belong to me. However i thought this will be of interets to the community. Thanks Keenan for this wonderful work. Following is quoted from Keenan. "During my time at NVIDIA I wrote a 3D Navier-Stokes fluid solver that runs entirely on the GPU. Fluid solvers are used to generate realistic, physically-based animations of water and smoke. Typically it takes several minutes or hours to generate each frame of animation, but by making some minor compromises in visual quality and taking advantage of the GPU's parallelism and bandwidth the solver is fast enough for real-time applications (e.g., around 120-180 frames per second at 64x64x128 on a GeForce 8800 GTX). See http://www.cs.caltech.edu/~keenan/pro... for more information."
 
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Added By - appliedmath
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Computer Simulations
Video Duration - 00:00:29
 
 
 

 

Title          
3D Printing from MIT 
   
 
Abstract    
In this video, we show how MIT research continues to push the boundaries of the burgeoning technology of 3-D printing. The following excerpt is from the MIT news office webpage at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/3d-printing-0914.html "The initial motivation was to produce models for visualization — for architects and others — and help streamline the development of new products, such as medical devices. Cima explains, “The slow step in product development was prototyping. We wanted to be able to rapidly prototype surgical tools, and get them into surgeons’ hands to get feedback.” 3DP technology involves building up a shape gradually, one thin layer at a time. The device uses a “stage” — a metal platform mounted on a piston — that’s raised or lowered by a tiny increment at a time. A layer of powder is spread across this platform, and then a print head similar to those used in inkjet printers deposits a binder liquid onto the powder, binding it together. Then, the platform is lowered infinitesimally, another thin layer of powder is applied on top of the last, and the next layer of binder is deposited."
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
United States Space Explorations 1958 
   
 
Abstract    
The film describes preparation and launch of five satellites and two space probes during 1958. On January 31, a Jupiter vehicle launched Explorer I into space. Data from this satellite was used to identify the van Allen radiation belts. On March 17, a Vanguard I rocket launched an Earth satellite with solar batteries. Data from the mission was used to determine that the Earth is slightly pear-shaped. On March 26, Explorer III was launched to further study the van Allen belts, micrometeoroid impacts, and internal and external temperatures. Explorer IV, launched on July 26, was intended to study radiation and temperature data. A lunar probe, ABLE I, was intended to measure radiation, magnetic fields of Earth and the Moon, density of micrometeoric matter, and internal temperatures. A four-stage rocket was used in the launch. However, a turbo-pump failed and the liquid oxygen pump stopped, resulting in a failed mission. On October 10, Pioneer I was launched by an ABLE vehicle. First and second stage velocity was less than desired and the probe did not leave Earth orbit. Attempts to attain escape velocity were unsuccessful. On December, a Jupiter boost vehicle was used to launch Juno II, with Pioneer III as the payload. Escape velocity...
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - 00:18:51
 
 
 

 

Title          
Feynman :: Inconceivable nature of nature 
   
 
Abstract    

A second or third gen PAL VHS dub of a vintage original off-air NTSC VHS tape, then captured and compressed and found on a torrent site. squashed, re-compressed and converted for YouTube. all sorts of obvious video and audio problems, but at least it's here, a special treat from the past. anyone with better source, please drop a comment.

Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 - February 15, 1988; IPA: /ˈfaɪnmən/) was an American physicist known for expanding the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, and particle theory. For his work on quantum electrodynamics, Feynman was a joint recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965, together with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga; he developed a widely-used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams.

He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb and was a member of the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the fie...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

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