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Videos search results: "Structural"
 
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Title          
IBM Research Computational Biology Center  
   
 
Abstract    

Computational biology is an interdisciplinary field that applies the techniques of computer science, applied mathematics and statistics to address biological problems. The main focus lies in the development of computational and statistical data analysis methods and in developing mathematical modeling and computational simulation techniques. By these means it addresses scientific research topics with their theoretical and experimental questions without a laboratory. It is connected to the following fields: (1) Computational biomodeling, a field concerned with building computer models of biological systems.(2)  

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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Bioengineering
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Carbon Nanotubes 
   
 
Abstract    
Julie MacPherson talks about her work with Carbon Nanotubes and Atomic Force Microscopy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon. A single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is a one-atom thick sheet of graphite (called graphene) rolled up into a seamless cylinder with diameter on the order of a nanometer. This results in a nanostructure where the length-to-diameter ratio exceeds 1,000,000. Such cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties that make them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient conductors of heat. Inorganic nanotubes have also been synthesized. Nanotubes are members of the fullerene structural family, which also includes buckyballs. Whereas buckyballs are spherical in shape, a nanotube is cylindrical, with at least one end typically capped with a hemisphere of the buckyball structure. Their name is derived from their size, since the diameter of a nanotube is in the order of a few nanometers (approximately 1/50,000th of the width of a human hair), while they can be up to several millimeters in length. Nanotubes are categorized as single-wal...
 
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Added By - scienceforum
Subject - Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:03:32
 
 
 

 

Title          
Structural Collapse: the classic case -Tacoma... 
   
 
Abstract    

The collapse of the bridge was recorded on film by Barney Elliott, owner of a local camera shop, and shows Leonard Coatsworth leaving the bridge after exiting his car. In 1998, The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." This footage is still shown to engineering, architecture, and physics students as a cautionary tale.[9] Elliot's original films of the construction and collapse of the bridge were shot on 16mm  

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Added By - justin
Subject - Civil and Environmental Enginering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:04:12
 
 
 

 

Title          
Cell division on contrast microscope 
   
 
Abstract    
Cell division is a process by which a cell, called the parent cell, divides into two cells, called daughter cells. Cell division is usually a small segment of a larger cell cycle. In meiosis however, a cell is permanently transformed and cannot divide again.

For simple unicellular organisms such as the Amoeba, one cell division reproduces an entire organism. On a larger scale, cell division can create progeny from multicellular organisms, such as plants that grow from cuttings. Cell division also enables sexually reproducing organisms to develop from the one-celled zygote, which itself was produced by cell division from gametes. And after growth, cell division allows for continual renewal and repair of the organism.

The primary concern of cell division is the maintenance of the original cell's genome. Before division can occur, the genomic information which is stored in chromosomes must be replicated, and the duplicated genome separated cleanly between cells. A great deal of cellular infrastructure is involved in keeping genomic information consistent between "generations".

Cells are classified into two categories: simple, non-nucleated prokaryotic cells, and complex, nucleated eukaryot...
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Nobel Laureate Venki Ramakrishnan: by Nature ... 
   
 
Abstract    
Venkatraman "Venki" Ramakrishnan (Tamil: வெங்கட்ராமன் ராமகிருஷ்ணன்; born 1952 in Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India) is a structural biologist at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.[1] He shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome".[2] Venkatraman Ramakrishnan was born in Chidambaram in Cuddalore district of Tamil Nadu, India.[3] He moved to Baroda (Vadodara) in Gujarat state at the age of three, where he had his schooling, except for spending 196061 in Adelaide, Australia. Following his Pre-Science at the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, he did his undergraduate studies in the same university on a National Science Talent Scholarship, graduating with a B.Sc. in Physics in 1971. In a January 2010 lecture at the Indian Institute of Science, he revealed that he failed to get a seat at any of the colleges of the Indian Institutes of Technology, and Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu.[4] Immediately after graduation he moved to the U.S.A., where ...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Bioengineering
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Influence of a Streamwise Pressure Gradient o... 
   
 
Abstract    

In this video, Kiran Dellimore gives a broad overview of his research paper entitled  'Influence of a Streamwise Pressure Gradient on Film-Cooling Effectiveness' published in the JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER,Vol. 23, No. 1, January-March 2009. His co-authors are Carlos Cruz, Andre W. Marshall, and Christopher P. Cadou all from the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742.

The paper may be accessed using the following DOI: 10.2514/1.35717

Film cooling is widely used in conventional gas turbine and rocket engines to minimize thermal loading of engine structures and to manage heat transfer between hot, reacting gases and cooler structural components. Previous experimental work has shown that streamwise pressure gradients strongly influence the performance of the film.This paper extends semi-empirical modeling ideas for wall-jet film cooling to include the effects of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The extended model shows that a pressure gradient’s effect on cooling performance depends on whether the velocity of the film is greater than the core flow (a wall-jet...

 
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Added By - kdellimo
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - 00:05:20
 
 
 

 

Title          
Crosswind Landing of Airbus 380 
   
 
Abstract    

A crosswind is any wind that is blowing perpendicular to a line of travel, or perpendicular to a direction. For example, in aviation, a crosswind is the component of wind which is blowing 90 degrees to the runway, making a landing more difficult than if the wind were blowing straight down the runway. In fact if a crosswind is strong enough it may exceed an aircraft's crosswind limit, and attempting to land under such conditions could cause structural damage to the aircraft's undercarriage.

Crosswinds can also occur when traveling on road, especially on large bridges and highways, which can be dangerous for motorists because of possi...

 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:01:07
 
 
 

 

Title          
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backs... 
   
 
Abstract    
Manifold Microchannel Cooler for Direct Backside Liquid Cooling of SiC Power Devices, presented by Lauren Everhart at the Mechanical Engineering Summer Lecture series at the University of Maryland (July 2008). Power semiconductor devices are semiconductor devices used as switches or rectifiers in power electronic circuits (switch mode power supplies for example). They are also called power devices or when used in integrated circuits, called power ICs. Some common power devices are the power diode, thyristor, power MOSFET and IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor). A power diode or MOSFET, for example, operates on similar principles as its low-power counterpart, but is able to carry a larger amount of current and typically is able to support a larger reverse-bias voltage in the off-state. Structural changes are often made in power devices to accommodate the higher current density, higher power dissipation and/or higher reverse breakdown voltage. The vast majority of the discrete (i.e non integrated) power devices are built using a vertical structure, whereas small-signal devices employ a lateral structure. With the vertical structure, the current rating of the device is proportional to its area, and the volta...
 
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Added By - researchusa
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Seminars and Presentations
Video Duration - 00:31:19
 
 
 

 

Title          
The wonders of a tiny cell 
   
 
Abstract    
a brief animation of one of the few things that happend in a cell. Thats when we start to scratch on the surface of some true complex systems.

The cell is the structural and functional unit of all known living organisms. It is the smallest unit of an organism that is classified as living, and is often called the building block of life.[1] Some organisms, such as most bacteria, are unicellular (consist of a single cell). Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular. (Humans have an estimated 100 trillion or 1014 cells; a typical cell size is 10 µm; a typical cell mass is 1   

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Added By - 123
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Computer Simulations
Video Duration - 00:02:50
 
 
 

 

Title          
Blood: Path of a Red Blood Cell 
   
 
Abstract    

Red blood cells are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate body's principal means of delivering oxygen from the lungs or gills to body tissues via the blood.


Human red blood cellsRed blood cells are also known as RBCs, haematids or erythrocytes (from Greek erythros for "red" and kytos for "hollow", with cyte nowadays translated as "cell"). RBCs should more properly be referred to as "corpuscles" rather than "cells", as a cells contains a nucleus while mature RBCs in mammals do not.

A schistocyte is a red blood cell undergoing fragmentation, or a fragmented part of a red blood cell.

Erythrocytes consist mainly of hemoglobin, a complex molecule containing heme groups whose iron atoms temporarily link to oxygen molecules in the lungs or gills and release them throughout the body. Oxygen can easily diffuse through the red blood cell's cell membrane. Hemoglobin also carries some of the waste product carbon dioxide back from the tissues. (In humans, less than 2% of the total oxygen, and most of the carbon dioxide, is held in solution in the blood plasma). A related compound, myoglobin, acts to store oxygen in muscle...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

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