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Videos search results: "Waves"
 
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Title          
Physics of Fluids - Waves in a large free sph... 
   
 
Abstract    
In physics a free surface is the surface of a body that is subject to neither perpendicular normal stress nor parallel shear stress, such as the boundary between two homogenous fluids, for example liquid water and the air in the Earth's atmosphere. Unlike liquids, gases cannot form a free surface on their own. A liquid in a gravitational field will form a free surface if unconfined from above. Under mechanical equilibrium this free surface must be perpendicular to the forces acting on the liquid; if not there would be a force along the surface, and the liquid would flow in that direction. Thus, on the surface of the Earth, all free surfaces of liquids are horizontal unless disturbed (except near solids dipping into them, where surface tension distorts the surface locally). If the free surface of a liquid is disturbed, waves are produced on the surface. These waves are not elastic waves due to any elastic force; they are gravity waves caused by the force of gravity tending to bring the surface of the disturbed liquid back to its horizontal level, but due to momentum, it overshoots. Thus it oscillates and spreads the disturbance to the neighboring portions of the surface. The velocity of the surface waves varies as the square ...
 
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Added By - sidpatel
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:02:52
 
 
 

 

Title          
Standing Waves in Air Columns 
   
 
Abstract    

Standing Waves in Air Columns is demonstrated. Nodes and antinodes are excited by a tuning fork for pipes that are open-open and open-closed. A classic demonstration of the Rayleigh's Criteria (widely used in studying combustion stability in aircraft, rocket and gas turbine engines) is demonstrated using a heated wire gauze placed inside a pipe at a suitable location inside the tube. This is called the Rijke Tube experiment.

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:09:58
 
 
 

 

Title          
Diffraction 
   
 
Abstract    

Diffraction is normally taken to refer to various phenomena which occur when a wave encounters an obstacle. It is described as the apparent bending of waves around small obstacles and the spreading out of waves past small openings. Very similar effects are observed when there is an alteration in the properties of the medium in which the wave is travelling, for example a variation in refractive index for light waves or in acoustic impedance for sound waves and these can also be referred to as diffraction effects. Diffraction occurs with all waves, including sound waves, water waves, and electromagnetic waves such as visible light, x-rays and  

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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:05:54
 
 
 

 

Title          
Shive Wave Machine - Standing Waves 
   
 
Abstract    

A Shive Wave Machine is a device used to demonstrate waves and wave mechanics. The Shive wave machine consists of a set of evenly spaces horizontal rods all attached to a square wire spine. Displacing a rod on one of the end will cause a wave to propagate across the machine. The end of square wire is able to clamped in order to demonstrate reflection, or can be dampened. The Shive wave machine is named after Dr. John N. Shive, who developed the device at Bell Labs in the 1970s. Since most wave motion takes place at speeds which are difficult to view, the Shive wave machine was created to in order to demonstrate slower transverse waves.

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:08:29
 
 
 

 

Title          
Interference 
   
 
Abstract    

In physics, interference is the addition (superposition) of two or more waves that results in a new wave pattern. Interference usually refers to the interaction of waves that are correlated or coherent with each other, either because they come from the same source or because they have the same or nearly the same frequency. Two non-monochromatic waves are only fully coherent with each other if they both have exactly the same range of wavelengths and the same phase differences at each of the constituent wavelengths. The total phase difference is derived from the sum of b...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:10:31
 
 
 

 

Title          
Standing waves in a String 
   
 
Abstract    

A standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave that remains in a constant position. This phenomenon can occur because the medium is moving in the opposite direction to the wave, or it can arise in a stationary medium as a result of interference between two waves traveling in opposite directions. In the second case, for waves of equal amplitude traveling in opposing directions, there is on average no net propagation of energy. Standing waves in resonators are one cause of the phenomenon called resonance. Standing waves are also observed in physical media such as strings and columns of air. Any waves traveling along the medium will reflect back when they reach the end. This effe...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:06:01
 
 
 

 

Title          
Standing Sound Waves 
   
 
Abstract    

A standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave that remains in a constant position. This phenomenon can occur because the medium is moving in the opposite direction to the wave, or it can arise in a stationary medium as a result of interference between two waves traveling in opposite directions. In the second case, for waves of equal amplitude traveling in opposing directions, there is on average no net propagation of energy. Standing waves in resonators are one cause of the phenomenon called resonance. Standing waves are also observed in physical media such as strings and columns of air. Any waves traveling along the medium will reflect back when they reach the end. This effe...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:07:51
 
 
 

 

Title          
Ruben's Tube 
   
 
Abstract    
The Rubens' tube, also known as the Standing wave flame tube, or simply flame tube, is a physics experiment demonstrating a standing wave. It shows the relationship between sound waves and air pressure.

A length of pipe is perforated along the top and sealed at both ends - one seal is attached to a small speaker or frequency generator, the other to a supply of a flammable gas(propane tank). The pipe is filled with the gas, and the gas leaking from the perforations is lit. When the speaker is turned on, the pressure changes caused by the sound waves will cause the flames to heighten in some areas and to lower in others.
If a constant frequency is used, it is possible to determine the wavelength by simply measuring with a ruler.
 
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Added By - sidpatel
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:02:48
 
 
 

 

Title          
Speed of Sound 
   
 
Abstract    

Sound is a vibration that travels through an elastic medium as a wave. The speed of sound describes how far this wave travels in a given amount of time. In dry air at 20 °C (68 °F), the speed of sound is 343 meters per second (1,125 ft/s). This equates to 1,236 kilometers per hour (768 mph), or about one mile in five seconds. This figure for air (or any given gas) increases with gas temperature (equations are given below), but is nearly independent of pressure or density for a given gas. For different gases, the speed of sound is dependent on the mean molecular weight of the gas, and to a lesser extent upon the wa...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:04:04
 
 
 

 

Title          
Doppler Effect 
   
 
Abstract    

The Doppler effect (or Doppler shift), named after Austrian physicist Christian Doppler who proposed it in 1842, is the change in frequency of a wave for an observer moving relative to the source of the waves. It is commonly heard when a vehicle sounding a siren approaches, passes and recedes from an observer. The received frequency is higher (compared to the emitted frequency) during the approach, it is identical at the instant of passing by, and it is lower during the recession. For waves that propagate in a medium, such as sound waves, the velocity of the observer and of the source are relative to the medium in which the waves are transmitted. The total Doppler effect may therefore result from motion of the source, motion of the observer, or moti...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:02:59
 
 
 

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