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Title          
Waves in a Large Free Sphere of Water 
   
 
Abstract    
Waves in a Large Free Sphere of Water - An experiment at the International Space Station. What humans perceive as "weight" is not actually the force of gravity pulling us towards the ground (actually, towards the center of the Earth — although this is the technical definition of "weight"). What we feel as "weight", is actually the normal reaction force of the ground (or whatever surface we are supported by) "pushing" upwards against us to counteract gravity's downward pull — that is: the "apparent weight". (In the remainder of this article, the term 'weight', without 'apparent', is used in this sense.) While this is not always intuitive, imagine the floor dropping out from under you: without it, you'd be falling — and experiencing weightlessness. It's the floor supporting you against gravity's pull — and which keeps you from falling to the center of the Earth — that creates the sensation of "weight".

For example: a person in a broken lift in free-fall "experiences" weightlessness. This is because there is no force from the lift's floor on the person's feet, against the pull of gravity, as both the lift and the person ...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Inner Life of a Cell: Leukocyte 
   
 
Abstract    
Harvard Biovisions. Check out http://www.nextgenmd.org/
science P-selectin glycoprotein leukocytes adhere endothelial cells interaction extracellular domain matrix surface type outer inner leaflet lipid bilayer sphingolipid raft recruit membrane protein cholesterol kinks saturated hydrocarbon chain fluidity inflammation chemokine proteoglycan transmembrane receptor cascade signalling reaction covalent fatty acid chain signal spectrin tetramer hexagonal network skeleton cytoskeleton filaments distribution cytosol microvilli actin bundles cross-link gel binding monomers plus end polymerization dynamic directional disassembly severing fragment depolymerize microtubules dimers tubulin stabilize cargo vesicle motor mitochondria centrosome pores nuclear envelope mRNA ribosome translate cytoplasm synthesis secrete translocator endoplasmic reticulum lumen integral glycosylation Golgi embedded diffuse G-protein coupled receptor conformation activation subunit change I-Cam immobilize blood adhesion transendothelial migration extravasation nucleus (more)
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

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