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Title          
Carbon Nanotubes 
   
 
Abstract    
Julie MacPherson talks about her work with Carbon Nanotubes and Atomic Force Microscopy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon. A single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is a one-atom thick sheet of graphite (called graphene) rolled up into a seamless cylinder with diameter on the order of a nanometer. This results in a nanostructure where the length-to-diameter ratio exceeds 1,000,000. Such cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties that make them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient conductors of heat. Inorganic nanotubes have also been synthesized. Nanotubes are members of the fullerene structural family, which also includes buckyballs. Whereas buckyballs are spherical in shape, a nanotube is cylindrical, with at least one end typically capped with a hemisphere of the buckyball structure. Their name is derived from their size, since the diameter of a nanotube is in the order of a few nanometers (approximately 1/50,000th of the width of a human hair), while they can be up to several millimeters in length. Nanotubes are categorized as single-wal...
 
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Added By - scienceforum
Subject - Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:03:32
 
 
 

 

Title          
FASTCAM MH4-10K : DigInfo 
   
 
Abstract    
DigInfo - http://movie.diginfo.tv Photron developed this high-speed camera system for use in vehicle safety tests. A single controller connects with up to four camera heads to enable the system to shoot high-speed, high-resolution imagery. By connecting multiple controllers to the system it is possible to monitor a greater number of angles using 8 to 12 camera heads. This camera system makes it possible to shoot high-speed (2,000 frames per second), high-resolution (512x512 pixels) images simultaneously from four different angles in order to evaluate motor vehicle safety during crash tests. The system enables engineers to obtain more detailed results than with previous camera systems. In motor vehicle crash tests it is necessary to shoot various locations within the vehicle compartment, and so it is necessary to position the cameras in confined spaces. To satisfy these requirements, Photron miniaturized the system camera heads. A single camera head weighs 100g and measures 35x35x34mm. Because the camera head is so small that it fits in the palm of even the tiniest of hands, it is possible to place numerous camera heads in previously hard to view spots such as the floor of the passenger seat, under the steering wheel, and so forth....
 
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Added By - matlabuser
Subject - Laboratory Equipment
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:01:48
 
 
 

 

Title          
Geometry + 4-Potentials = Unified Field Theor... 
   
 
Abstract    
In physics, a unified field theory is a type of field theory that allows all of the fundamental forces between elementary particles to be written in terms of a single field. There is no accepted unified field theory yet, and this remains an open line of research. The term was coined by Albert Einstein who attempted to unify the general theory of relativity with electromagnetism. A Theory of Everything is closely related to unified field theory, but differs by not requiring the basis of nature to be fields, and also attempts to explain all physical constants of nature. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_unified_field_theory
 
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Added By - scienceforum
Subject - Physics
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:17:23
 
 
 

 

Title          
Periodic and non-periodic motion 
   
 
Abstract    
In mechanics and physics, simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement. It can serve as a mathematical model of a variety of motions, such as the oscillation of a spring. In addition, other phenomena can be approximated by simple harmonic motion, including the motion of a simple pendulum as well as molecular vibration. Simple harmonic motion is typified by the motion of a mass on a spring when it is subject to the linear elastic restoring force given by Hooke's Law. The motion is sinusoidal in time and demonstrates a single resonant frequency. Simple harmonic motion provides a basis for the characterization of more complicated motions through the techniques of Fourier analysis.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Simple Harmonic Motion 
   
 
Abstract    
MIT Physics professor Walter Lewin explains Simple Harmonic Motion. In mechanics and physics, simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement. It can serve as a mathematical model of a variety of motions, such as the oscillation of a spring. In addition, other phenomena can be approximated by simple harmonic motion, including the motion of a simple pendulum as well as molecular vibration. Simple harmonic motion is typified by the motion of a mass on a spring when it is subject to the linear elastic restoring force given by Hooke's Law. The motion is sinusoidal in time and demonstrates a single resonant frequency. Simple harmonic motion provides a basis for the characterization of more complicated motions through the techniques of Fourier analysis.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Cellular Division 
   
 
Abstract    
The cell cycle, or cell-division cycle, is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its replication. These events can be divided in two broad periods: interphase—during which the cell grows, accumulating nutrients needed for mitosis and duplicating its DNA—and the mitotic (M) phase, during which the cell splits itself into two distinct cells, often called "daughter cells". The cell-division cycle is an essential process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hair, skin, blood cells, and some internal organs are renewed.

The cell cycle consists of four distinct phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase (collectively known as interphase) and M phase. M phase is itself composed of two tightly coupled processes: mitosis, in which the cell's chromosomes are divided between the two daughter cells, and cytokinesis, in which the cell's cytoplasm divides forming distinct cells. Activation of each phase is dependent on the proper progression and completion of the previous one. Cells that have temporarily or reversibly stopped dividing are said to have entered a state of quiescence called G0 phase.

 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Experiments with the Mobius Strip 
   
 
Abstract    
The Möbius strip or Möbius band (pronounced /moʊbiːəs, mei-/ i.e. beginning with "Moe" or "may"; German /ˈmøbiʊs/) is a surface with only one side and only one boundary component. It has the mathematical property of being non-orientable. It is also a ruled surface. It was discovered independently by the German mathematicians August Ferdinand Möbius and Johann Benedict Listing in 1858 [1] [2] [3].

A model can easily be created by taking a paper strip and giving it a half-twist, and then joining the ends of the strip together to form a single strip. In Euclidean space there are in fact two types of Möbius strips depending on the direction of the half-twist: clockwise and counterclockwise. The Möbius strip is therefore chiral, which is to say that it is "handed".

It is straightforward to find algebraic equations the solutions of which have the topology of a Möbius strip, but in general these equations do not describe the same geometric shape that one gets from the twisted paper model described above. In particular, the twisted paper model is a developable surface (it has zero Gaussian curvature). A system of differential-algebraic equations that describes models of this type was ...
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Mathematics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Amazing Liquid 
   
 
Abstract    
A non-Newtonian fluid is a fluid in which the viscosity changes with the applied strain rate. As a result, non-Newtonian fluids may not have a well-defined viscosity.

Although the concept of viscosity is commonly used to characterize a material, it can be inadequate to describe the mechanical behavior of a substance, particularly non-Newtonian fluids. They are best studied through several other rheological properties which relate the relations between the stress and strain tensors under many different flow conditions, such as oscillatory shear, or extensional flow which are measured using different devices or rheometers. The rheological properties are better studied using tensor-valued constitutive equations, which are common in the field of continuum mechanics.

An inexpensive, non-toxic sample of a non-Newtonian fluid sometimes known as oobleck can be made very easily by adding corn starch (cornflour) to a cup of water. Add the starch in small portions and stir it in slowly. When the suspension nears the critical concentration - becoming like single cream (light cream) in consistency - the so called "shear thickening" property of this non-Newtonian fluid becomes apparent. The application of force - f...
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Material Science and Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Single Molecule Fluorescence 
   
 
Abstract    
Fluorescence is a member of the ubiquitous luminescence family of processes in which susceptible molecules emit light from electronically excited states created by either a physical (for example, absorption of light), mechanical (friction), or chemical mechanism. Generation of luminescence through excitation of a molecule by ultraviolet or visible light photons is a phenomenon termed photoluminescence, which is formally divided into two categories, fluorescence and phosphorescence, depending upon the electronic configuration of the excited state and the emission pathway. Fluorescence is the property of some atoms and molecules to absorb light at a particular wavelength and to subsequently emit light of longer wavelength after a brief interval, termed the fluorescence lifetime. The process of phosphorescence occurs in a manner similar to fluorescence, but with a much longer excited state lifetime. Fundamental Aspects of Fluorescence Microscopy - The modern fluorescence microscope combines the power of high performance optical components with computerized control of the instrument and digital image acquisition to achieve a level of sophistication that far exceeds that of simple observation by the human eye. Microscopy now depends...
 
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Added By - quantum
Subject - Physics
Document Type -
Video Duration - 00:01:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Apollo-Lunar Orbital Rendezvous Technique 
   
 
Abstract    
The film shows artists rendition of the spacecrafts, boosters, and flight of the Apollo lunar missions. The Apollo spacecraft will consist of three modules: the manned Command Module; the Service Module, which contains propulsion systems; and the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) to carry astronauts to the moon and back to the Command and Service Modules. The spacecraft will be launched via a three-stage Saturn booster. The first stage will provide 7.5 million pounds of thrust from five F-1 engines for liftoff and initial powered flight. The second stage will develop 1 million pounds of thrust from five J-2 engines to boost the spacecraft almost into Earth orbit. Immediately after ignition of the second stage, the Launch Escape System will be jettisoned. A single J-2 engine in the S4B stage will provide 200,000 pounds of thrust to place the spacecraft in an earth parking orbit. It also will be used to propel the spacecraft into a translunar trajectory, then it will separate from the Apollo Modules. Onboard propulsion systems will be used to insert the spacecraft into lunar orbit. Two astronauts will enter the LEM, which will separate from the command and service modules. The LEM will go into elliptical orbit and prepare for landing. Th...
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:05:45
 
 
 

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