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Title          
The physics of sound 
   
 
Abstract    

chladni plate experiment.

 

 
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Added By - matlabuser
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:02:09
 
 
 

 

Title          
Speed of Sound 
   
 
Abstract    

Sound is a vibration that travels through an elastic medium as a wave. The speed of sound describes how far this wave travels in a given amount of time. In dry air at 20 °C (68 °F), the speed of sound is 343 meters per second (1,125 ft/s). This equates to 1,236 kilometers per hour (768 mph), or about one mile in five seconds. This figure for air (or any given gas) increases with gas temperature (equations are given below), but is nearly independent of pressure or density for a given gas. For different gases, the speed of sound is dependent on the mean molecular weight of the gas, and to a lesser extent upon the wa...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:04:04
 
 
 

 

Title          
Ruben's Tube 
   
 
Abstract    
The Rubens' tube, also known as the Standing wave flame tube, or simply flame tube, is a physics experiment demonstrating a standing wave. It shows the relationship between sound waves and air pressure.

A length of pipe is perforated along the top and sealed at both ends - one seal is attached to a small speaker or frequency generator, the other to a supply of a flammable gas(propane tank). The pipe is filled with the gas, and the gas leaking from the perforations is lit. When the speaker is turned on, the pressure changes caused by the sound waves will cause the flames to heighten in some areas and to lower in others.
If a constant frequency is used, it is possible to determine the wavelength by simply measuring with a ruler.
 
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Added By - sidpatel
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:02:48
 
 
 

 

Title          
Rijke Tube 
   
 
Abstract    
Rijke's tube turns heat into sound, by creating a self-amplifying standing wave. It is an entertaining phenomenon in acoustics and is an excellent example of resonance. P. L. Rijke was a professor of physics at the Leiden University in the Netherlands when, in 1859, he discovered a way of using heat to sustain a sound in a cylindrical tube open at both ends. He used a glass tube, about 0.8 m long and 3.5 cm in diameter. Inside it, about 20 cm from one end, he placed a disc of wire gauze as shown in the figure at right. Friction with the walls of the tube is sufficient to keep the gauze in position. With the tube vertical and the gauze in the lower half, he heated the gauze with a flame until it was glowing red hot. Upon removing the flame, he obtained a loud sound from the tube which lasted until the gauze cooled down (about 10 s). It is safer in modern reproductions of this experiment to use a Pyrex tube or, better still, one made of metal. Source : Wikipedia
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Audible Frequency Range 
   
 
Abstract    
An audio frequency (abbreviation: AF) or audible frequency is characterized as a periodic vibration whose frequency is audible to the average human. It is the property of sound that most determines pitch and is measured in hertz (Hz). The generally accepted standard range of audible frequencies is 20 to 20,000 Hz, although the range of frequencies individuals hear is greatly influenced by environmental factors. Frequencies below 20 Hz are generally felt rather than heard, assuming the amplitude of the vibration is great enough. Frequencies above 20,000 Hz can sometimes be sensed by young people. High frequencies are the first to be affected by hearing loss due to age and/or prolonged exposure to very loud noises.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Aerodynamics 
   
 
Abstract    
Aerodynamics (shaping of objects that affect the flow of air or gas) is a branch of fluid dynamics concerned with the study of forces generated on a body in a flow. The solution of an aerodynamic problem normally involves calculating for various properties of the flow, such as velocity, pressure, density, and temperature, as a function of space and time. Understanding the flow pattern makes it possible to calculate or approximate the forces and moments acting on bodies in the flow. The use of mathematical analysis, empirical approximation and wind tunnel experimentation form the scientific basis for heavier-than-air flight.


Airflow across an aircraft wing. A greater angle deflects air downwards at a geater angle to increase LiftAerodynamic problems can be classified in a number of ways. The flow environment defines the first classification criterion. External aerodynamics is the study of flow around solid objects of various shapes. Evaluating the lift and drag on an airplane, the shock waves that form in front of the nose of a rocket or the flow of air over a hard drive head are examples of external aerodynamics. Internal aerodynamics is the study of flow through passages in solid objects. For instance, intern...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Experiments
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Sound Reflection from Concave Surfaces 
   
 
Abstract    

Reflection is the change in direction of a wavefront at an interface between two different media so that the wavefront returns into the medium from which it originated. Common examples include the reflection of light, sound and water waves. The law of reflection says that for specular reflection the angle at which the wave is incident on the surface equals the angle at which it is reflected. Mirrors exhibit specular reflection. In acoustics, reflection causes echoes and is...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:04:44
 
 
 

 

Title          
Diffraction 
   
 
Abstract    

Diffraction is normally taken to refer to various phenomena which occur when a wave encounters an obstacle. It is described as the apparent bending of waves around small obstacles and the spreading out of waves past small openings. Very similar effects are observed when there is an alteration in the properties of the medium in which the wave is travelling, for example a variation in refractive index for light waves or in acoustic impedance for sound waves and these can also be referred to as diffraction effects. Diffraction occurs with all waves, including sound waves, water waves, and electromagnetic waves such as visible light, x-rays and  

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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:05:54
 
 
 

 

Title          
Doppler Effect 
   
 
Abstract    

The Doppler effect (or Doppler shift), named after Austrian physicist Christian Doppler who proposed it in 1842, is the change in frequency of a wave for an observer moving relative to the source of the waves. It is commonly heard when a vehicle sounding a siren approaches, passes and recedes from an observer. The received frequency is higher (compared to the emitted frequency) during the approach, it is identical at the instant of passing by, and it is lower during the recession. For waves that propagate in a medium, such as sound waves, the velocity of the observer and of the source are relative to the medium in which the waves are transmitted. The total Doppler effect may therefore result from motion of the source, motion of the observer, or moti...

 
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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:02:59
 
 
 

 

Title          
Sound Propagation in Vacuum 
   
 
Abstract    

Sound is a travelling wave which is an oscillation of pressure transmitted through a solid, liquid, or gas, composed of frequencies within the range of hearing and of a level sufficiently strong to be heard, or the sensation stimulated in organs of hearing by such vibrations. The mechanical vibrations that can be interpreted as sound are able to travel through all forms of matter: gases, liquids, solids, and  

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Added By - reberg
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - 00:03:31
 
 
 

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