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Videos search results: "viscoelasticity"
 
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Title          
Leaping shampoo and the stable Kaye effect  
   
 
Abstract    
DOI - 10.1088/1742-5468/2006/07/P07007 Shear-thinning fluids exhibit surprisingly rich behavior. One example is the Kaye effect which occurs when a thin stream of a solution of polyisobutylene in decalin is poured into a dish of the fluid. As pouring proceeds, a small stream of liquid occasionally leaps upward from the heap. This surprising effect, which lasts only a second or so, is named after its first observer, Kaye, who could offer no explanation for this behaviour. Later, Collyer and Fischer suggested from 250 frames s−1 cine recordings that the fluid must be highly shear thinning as well as elastic and 'pituitous' (slimy or sticky). In addition, their results suggested that a rigid surface is required to back the reflected liquid stream. While the words bouncing and reflection are associated with elastic effects, we will show here that the Kaye effect is in fact a continuous flow phenomenon. We show that the Kaye effect works for many common fluids, including shampoos and liquid soaps. We reveal its physical mechanism (formation, stability and disruption) through high-speed imaging. The measurements are interpreted with a simple theoretical model including only the shear thinning behaviour of the liquid; elastic p...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

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