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Title          
GRASP Lab UPenn 
   
 
Abstract    
This video premiered at the TED2012 Conference in Long Beach, California on February 29, 2012. Deputy Dean for Education and GRASP lab member Vijay Kumar presented some of this groundbreaking work at the TED2012 conference, an international gathering of people and ideas from technology, entertainment, and design. Flying robot quadrotors perform the James Bond Theme by playing various instruments including the keyboard, drums and maracas, a cymbal, and the debut of an adapted guitar built from a couch frame. The quadrotors play this "couch guitar" by flying over guitar strings stretched across a couch frame; plucking the strings with a stiff wire attached to the base of the quadrotor. A special microphone attached to the frame records the notes made by the "couch guitar". These flying quadrotors are completely autonomous, meaning humans are not controlling them; rather they are controlled by a computer programed with instructions to play the instrume...
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Computer Science
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Infinite loop in a software program 
   
 
Abstract    
An infinite loop (also known as an endless loop or unproductive loop) is a sequence of instructions in a computer program which loops endlessly, either due to the loop having no terminating condition, having one that can never be met, or one that causes the loop to start over. In older operating systems with cooperative multitasking, infinite loops normally caused the entire system to become unresponsive. With the now-prevalent preemptive multitasking model, infinite loops usually cause the program to consume all available processor time, but can usually be terminated by the user. Busy-wait loops are also sometimes called "infinite loops". One possible cause of a computer "freezing" is an infinite loop; others include deadlock and access violations.
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Computer Science
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Hydraulic Model of Cardio Vascular System 
   
 
Abstract    

Dr Anderson's patent on Extracorporeal heart can be found here

From Youtube - The video demonstrates the unique nature of the heart as a non-sucking pump, whose output is controlled by systemic factors, as opposed to pumps (such as standard roller pumps) that suck to fill, whose output is controlled by pump factors. It also shows the determinative effects of Mean Vascular Pressure, Inlet Impedance, and the critical role of the atrium on cardiac output. The resulting understanding is far more illuminating of the actual determinants of cardiac output than the emphasis on concepts like "stroke rate times stroke volume," preload, afterload, and contractility that dominates many basic physiology courses. Robert M. Anderson, MD (1920-2010) was Associate Professor of Surgery and Associate Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson, Arizona, and a Fellow of both the American College of Cardiology and the American College of Surgeons.

 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Bioengineering
Document Type - Assignment
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Jumping droplets help heat transfer 
   
 
Abstract    
Excerpt from MIT's Research Update - Many industrial plants depend on water vapor condensing on metal plates: In power plants, the resulting water is then returned to a boiler to be vaporized again; in desalination plants, it yields a supply of clean water. The efficiency of such plants depends crucially on how easily droplets of water can form on these metal plates, or condensers, and how easily they fall away, leaving room for more droplets to form. The key to improving the efficiency of such plants is to increase the condensers’ heat-transfer coefficient — a measure of how readily heat can be transferred away from those surfaces, explains Nenad Miljkovic, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering at MIT. As part of his thesis research, he and colleagues have done just that: designing, making and testing a coated surface with nanostructured patterns that greatly increase the heat-transfer coefficient.

The results of that work have been published in the journal Nano Letters, in a paper co-authored by Mil...

 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Patents and Inventions
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Fish Inspired Wind Turbines 
   
 
Abstract    
Excerpt from http://www.caltech.edu/article/13430 "The power output of wind farms can be increased by an order of magnitude—at least tenfold—simply by optimizing the placement of turbines on a given plot of land, say researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) who have been conducting a unique field study at an experimental two-acre wind farm in northern Los Angeles County. A paper describing the findings—the results of field tests conducted by John Dabiri, Caltech professor of aeronautics and bioengineering, and colleagues during the summer of 2010—appears in the July issue of the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy."
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Bioengineering
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
3D Printing from MIT 
   
 
Abstract    
In this video, we show how MIT research continues to push the boundaries of the burgeoning technology of 3-D printing. The following excerpt is from the MIT news office webpage at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/3d-printing-0914.html "The initial motivation was to produce models for visualization — for architects and others — and help streamline the development of new products, such as medical devices. Cima explains, “The slow step in product development was prototyping. We wanted to be able to rapidly prototype surgical tools, and get them into surgeons’ hands to get feedback.” 3DP technology involves building up a shape gradually, one thin layer at a time. The device uses a “stage” — a metal platform mounted on a piston — that’s raised or lowered by a tiny increment at a time. A layer of powder is spread across this platform, and then a print head similar to those used in inkjet printers deposits a binder liquid onto the powder, binding it together. Then, the platform is lowered infinitesimally, another thin layer of powder is applied on top of the last, and the next layer of binder is deposited."
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Demonstration
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
NASA's Curiosity Finds First Evidence Of Wate... 
   
 
Abstract    
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has found clear evidence of water on the Red Planet, scientists report ! Images taken by Curiosity show rounded stones cemented into the rock. Planetary scientist Rebecca Williams says these stones are too big to have been moved by wind. The $2.5 billion Mars Curiosity mission is NASA's first astrobiology mission since the 1970s.
 
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Added By - samriddha
Subject - Uncategorized
Document Type - Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
adorable extremophiles 
   
 
Abstract    
Hank explains why NASA and the European Space Agency are in love with tardigrades and how these extremophiles are helping us study the panspermia hypothesis.
 
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Added By - samriddha
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Documentary
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Overdamped and Critically Damped Oscillations 
   
 
Abstract    
The value of the damping ratio ζ determines the behavior of the system. A damped harmonic oscillator can be: (a) Overdamped (ζ > 1): The system returns (exponentially decays) to equilibrium without oscillating. Larger values of the damping ratio ζ return to equilibrium more slowly. (b) Critically damped (ζ = 1): The system returns to equilibrium as quickly as possible without oscillating. This is often desired for the damping of systems such as doors. (c) Underdamped (0 < ζ < 1): The system oscillates (at reduced frequency compared to the undamped case) with the amplitude gradually decreasing to zero. (d) Undamped (ζ = 0): The system oscillates at its natural resonant frequency (ωo). Source: Wikipedia
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
RLC Circuit Oscillations 
   
 
Abstract    
An RLC circuit (or LCR circuit) is an electrical circuit consisting of a resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor, connected in series or in parallel. The RLC part of the name is due to those letters being the usual electrical symbols for resistance, inductance and capacitance respectively. The circuit forms a harmonic oscillator for current and will resonate in a similar way as an LC circuit will. The main difference that the presence of the resistor makes is that any oscillation induced in the circuit will die away over time if it is not kept going by a source. This effect of the resistor is called damping. The presence of the resistance also reduces the peak resonant frequency somewhat. Some resistance is unavoidable in real circuits, even if a resistor is not specifically included as a component. A pure LC circuit is an ideal which really only exists in theory. Source: Wikipedia
 
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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Course Lecture
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

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